Renowned Washington, DC based trial lawyer, Patrick Malone, joins us to talk about his latest book, The Fearless Cross Examiner: Win the Witness, Win the Case and many other topics. Listeners will learn about Pat's approach to cross examination, as well as his expertise in medical malpractice cases and his recent lawsuit against former President Trump arising out of the January insurrection.

What you will learn from this episode.

The episode begins with a discussion of how Pat went from graduating Yale Law School to becoming one of the nation's leading medical malpractice plaintiff's trial lawyers.  Pat talks about how he started as a newspaper reporter covering malpractice trials, and was drawn to this field even before attending law school.  Pat talks about what drew him to medical malpractice cases, why these cases are hard for plaintiffs to win and strategies he has used for success, including lessons he has applied from his groundbreaking work co-authored with Rick Friedman, Rules of the Road.   Pat later adapted the "rules" approach to medical malpractice cases in his book, Winning Medical Malpractice Cases with the Rules of the Road Technique.

Pat discusses how his own personal journey raising an autistic son brought him face to face with the medical establishment and helped him to develop his own sense of empathy--a trait which has helped him relate to clients with similar struggles.  

Pat discussed his latest book, The Fearless Cross Examiner.  He explains why some of the commonly-taught techniques for cross examination are wrong and how he has developed some better approaches.  He explores both the technical and human aspects of cross examination.

About
Pat Malone

Photo of Pat Malone

Patrick Malone is a son of the Midwest. He grew up in an Irish Catholic family in Wichita, Kansas, the oldest of seven children. After graduating summa cum laude from the University of Kansas, he worked as a reporter for United Press International in Kansas City, then won a prestigious journalism fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he studied public health issues and wrote freelance articles for the Washington Post. Malone then worked as a medical writer and investigative reporter for the Miami Herald, where he won a number of awards, including a finalist designation for the Pulitzer Prize for a series co-authored on “dangerous doctors.”

 

After he was accepted at Yale Law School, Malone and his wife Vicki sold their home in Miami and moved to a rental apartment in New Haven, Connecticut with their infant son. They had one more son while at Yale and a third after moving to the Washington area. At Yale, Malone won several student awards, including best “moot court” argument. He worked for a year after graduating for a prominent federal judge, U.S. District Judge Gerhard Gesell in Washington, D.C. In 1985, Patrick Malone began his career as an attorney representing seriously injured people.

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